LIVE //

SLIP DOWN THE ALLEYWAY // CHRIS GOES TO LANEWAY

Monday, February 21st, 2011 by Chris

Laneway Festival

St Jerome’s Laneway Festival
Cultural Centre, Northbridge.
12/2/2011

By Chris Wheeldon

The Big Day Out one weekend, Laneway the next, never a dull moment in Perth. The difference between the two festivals is mammoth not only in punters but also in bands and the mentality of the day.

Laneway is a hipster and wannabe hipster’s paradise. A place where indie kids can shrug shoulders with original indie kids, a place where the day counts but it seems the music is much more important.

Set in the wonderful surrounds of the Cultural Centre, Fringe World glistened in the sunshine and the newly renovated urban garden created the perfect backdrop.

After finishing a quick stint on radio and dodging my way through the bike race taking place through Northbridge I walked in to catch the end of The Antlers. A band that recorded are a cavalcade of sounds and melodies, live they struggled to convey the complexity of their recordings.

Violent Soho, over on The PICA stage however had no sense of complexity. Instead they were straight up ballsy rock and roll. Harking back to the sound of Nirvana and Magic Dirt, this Brisbane band leave little room for your ears to recover and it was only 4pm.

Over on the Frances Street stage there seemed to be a bottle neck as people clambered for shade and to get a sight of the wonderful women of Warpaint. Brooklyn in a nutshell, this four-piece sound checked away lulling people into the belief the show had started. When it did the swelling crowd were treated to a tribal, bass filled set of songs that echoed through the afternoon air.

Dashing off to check Menomena I was surprised at the small size of the crowd. One of last year’s finest albums should have indicated higher interest but the extra space was wonderful. They set about a well-crafted and extremely enjoyable forty-minute set. Musicians in every sense this five piece dance about instruments and sounds that bellow from their arrangements.

I set in for a couple of hours at the PICA stage as the sun began to set. PVT began their final show of a very long tour in true form. This was a show form the Sydney boys that they had clearly been looking forward to. Their energy, passion and talent oozed from the stage and into the hearts of a growing crowd.

Blonde Redhead boasted the most impressive resume of all the bands on Laneway this year and their set showed their pedigree. Decked out in white the New York natives created a wall of sound that filled the amphitheatre, bouncing back off the library glass. Standing in that wall of sound is the best way to listen to Blonde Redhead, their music and melodies grip you and envelope you as they dance around on stage.

Les Savy Fav leave nothing on stage when they play. Word spreads quickly when things get crazy. It took Les Savy Fav half a song before singer Tim Harrington was off. He dived into the crowd and managed through forty minutes to see every inch of his audience. Technically the show suffered a little but this band put a smile on your face that goes nowhere until they leave.

Elsewhere, Arial Pink’s Haunted Graffiti played to a massive crowd treating them to, not just a musical feast but a show, costumes and lights and dancing. Glam is not dead.

Holy Fuck took off on the PICA stage. Their intricately woven sounds show a complexity that most mathematicians would struggle with. This was one of those shows that to really enjoy you had to be involved. This is not a band that will engage you with witty banter but instead tear your head off with electronic music that you may never hear unless Holy Fuck were in front of you.

Deerhunter finished my evening with their treble filled aural explosion. Catching the last few tracks of their set they seemed a little washed out and at times their drummer battled with timing. Bradford Cox owned the stage even if he struggled to think of ‘anything cool to say’. However it seem that they may have played one too many shows in recent times, they seemed tired and little ready to head back home.

As the hipsters and crew headed off into the night, perhaps to forget they were hipsters and revert back to their bogan credentials, the indie fest that is Laneway provided an oasis for the festival going audience. It’s interesting how successful music festivals can be when they concentrate providing good music.

READ MORE //
 

CUT & PASTE MICRO-FESTIVAL

Monday, October 11th, 2010 by Matt

CP10_FacebookImageOneAfter nearly five years as Perth’s most important independent cross platform street publication Cut & Paste is about to crack double figures and release Cut & Paste DVD Issue 10.

We always launch with a party and this time around we have something extra special in the works: A Micro-Festival held in the newly renovated and reopened Bakery on Saturday December 11 2010.

READ MORE //
 

ON THE BRIGHT SIDE //

Wednesday, July 28th, 2010 by Chris

On The Bright SideWHAT: On The Bright Side

WHERE: Esplanade, Perth

WHEN: 24/07/10

The iTunes generation was out and about, as On The Bright Side took over the Esplanade with a day of fun, music and the band that changed the decade.

Opening acts, The Middle East and Bluejuice may have been missed by many, as the line to collect tickets was rather large. I missed them because it was Saturday morning.

Hot Chip played a short but interesting set. This is a band that has been around awhile and they play their fun time party tracks with a lot of professionalism. Crowd favorites, Over and Over and Hold On echoed within the single tent stage to an appreciative and growing crowd; a crowd that knew the singles and ran to hear them when those singles dropped. On the down side five songs is not much of a set from a well-respected international band.

Hot Chip 1

From professional and talented, to completely woeful and pointless; Art vs. Science. A fifty-minute set which had not one single redeeming quality. They make music by numbers, everything seemed contrived and by the book looking for a set reaction by a crowd that unfortunately lapped it up. They have energy but energy doesn’t write you a decent song. They rely on stupid and aimless clichés, basic chord progression and the same drumbeat in every song. If you were fifteen and had copious amounts of chemicals in your blood you may have enjoyed it, if you’re not I hope you walked away.

Thankfully Band Of Horses are one of those true American bands, in the vain of The Traveling Wilburys and The Band. Standing before a crowd looking to party, they produced a set that drew the energy level down but in no way let down the crowd. Band Of Horses 1

Older favorites, There’s A Ghost, No Ones Gonna Love You and Ode To LRC, along side newer tracks Loredo and Factory were highlights. This band writes songs not to impress but to entertain and enlighten.

Considered by some as Australia’s answer to the great American band Angus and Julia Stone stepped up next. Full of innocence and true talent, the siblings played a subtle almost subdued set. Big Train and the slowed down You’re The One That I Want brought the crowd to them but they seemingly struggled to maintain a level of energy and intrigue perhaps needed at the later time slot.

Every now and again a band comes along who garner a hell of a lot of success off one or two singles. Mumford and Sons are that type of band. Of course they played the song, the fucked it up song and the other one, The Cave and the crowd enjoyed every single moment, dancing like they had never heard it before. That is the beauty of this band, they know how to arrange a song to get people moving and singing and they play those songs very, very well on stage. Mumford & Sons 5

It was some of the quieter moments incorporating a brass section and strings that really made this set. Dust Bowl Dance is a beautiful song and hearing it belted out within a packed festival tent was something even a cynical music snob could enjoy.

To The Strokes and a return to 2001. From the onset this Manhattan garage band played the songs that the ten thousand strong audience wanted to hear: New York City Cops, Hard To Explain, The Modern Age, Is This It and the quite brilliant Someday.

The Strokes were all there and they were all played with absolute perfection. Finishing off with Last Night before returning for a quick fire encore, saying goodbye with Take It Or Leave It. You could argue that they were half an hour short for their allotted time, but they are a garage rock band who play three minutes songs, an hour of dam good music was more then enough. The Strokes 7

©Chris Wheeldon. 24th July 2010.

Click on an image to see full size. All images by Nicole Norelli

READ MORE //
 

PFROND // LAUNCH PAD

Wednesday, July 14th, 2010 by John

READ MORE //
 

SUGAR ARMY // LIVE AT AMPLIFIER

Wednesday, July 7th, 2010 by Chris

mg_0820

WHAT: SUGAR ARMY. With Young Revelry and Emperors

WHERE: Amplifier Bar, Perth

WHEN: 3/07/10

It’s July and it’s cold but Sugar Army are keeping everything under control as they head around Perth on their In Control Tour. The third of four dates brought them and an irrepressible crowd to the Amplifier bar.

Support heroes, Emperors began the eve. Every time these guys play they seem to get better. Their songs have moved from mundane and bland to well crafted and with even better execution.

New single, The River and a reworked version of Favorite Colours were highlights from quite a delightful set that perhaps moved this band from OK to, dare a say it, a band to watch.

Young Revelry jumped up on stage for the second support slot. Starting off with a flurry of noise, distortion and heaviness, hopes were high for a band I had yet to see.

However as they settled down into their set my hopes faded. Young Revelry are in no way a bad band, but for me they were bland, repetitive and for the most part devoid of any real sense of self.

So to everyone’s favorite tasty treat: Sugar Army. From the outset it was clear that Sugars are well rehearsed, experienced and a downright good band. They played a fine set of new songs, in-between older tracks. Sugar Army gave the Saturday night crowd quite a treat.

They way they are able to weave tracks together is, in part, down to the hard work they put in the rehearsal rooms but more so due to the comfort they have with each other on stage.

Greed is Good, Where Do You Hide Your Toys? and new track In Control soared throughout the small room and the crowd were loving it. It was good to see an Amplifier crowd interested and involved in the live music they were witnessing.

Finishing with Acute and crowd favorite Tongues In Cheeks were a measure of how in tune Sugars were on this eve. With new tracks on the way, new recordings and further shows, the Army marches on.

©Chris Wheeldon. 5th July 2010.

Photos by Lisa Businovski Click any picture to see it full size!

READ MORE //
 

WAMi 10 // THE CRAFTIES

Tuesday, May 18th, 2010 by Matt

Tomas_Ford_WammingtonMonday 17 at the Rosemount saw the first set of Wammingtons handed out to the industry’s  best practicioners. The Craft Awards are given to those people who are considered the Best in their field by their peers…

READ MORE //
 

CUT AND PASTE // FESTIVAL OPENING NIGHT IMPRESSION

Wednesday, February 10th, 2010 by Matt
laFura_1

The giant hamster wheel with trees and Bell Tower

by: malone

La Fura dels Baus are not your average theatre company. Their work regularly challenges audiences all over the world by using non-traditional settings and exploring performance on gigantic scales.

It is impossible at a La Fura performance to sit back and remain detached from the action. The Supreme Court Gardens were full to overflowing, no chairs, sitting would have resulted in a severe trampling, by the time the huge crane began its dance and the  mob beneath surged around the performers who retaliated by hurling bombs into the crowd filled with flour and water.  It’s part of the La Fura approach, limit the distinction between performer and audience, make it feel dangerous and visceral.

Designed specifically for Perth Festival, this performance captured Perth’s most important contemporary symbol – the crane. Huge, imposing and repeated across our skyline, cranes evoke a sense of industrial progress.  Someone recently suggested in a tweet that Perth should have a sign up at the Airport advising visitors that we are “under construction”  it seems La Fuara tapped into that Potential Perth, a new, open, lively, creative place: Under Construction.

The counterpoint was equally present in Friday’s Festival Opening Performance, evinced by people in what can only be described as a giant hamster wheel that descended from the sky, an angry machine charged forward and back through the crowd, from time to time it would rear up and its horns lurch out above the crowd. These things remind us that industrial progress is not without cost.

Yet this performance was also a celebration of humanity in a world lurching after its desires. The solo human singing voice provided a counterpoint to the mechanical banging and deep thrum soundtrack. A final montage of white suited people dancing in the air, the sky lit up with fireworks and at ground level a stage filled with performers sharing joy with the audience.

The crowd drew breath as one and then streamed out into the night.

READ MORE //